Sunday, July 26, 2009

Lions and lambs

In his book Orthodoxy, G.K. Chesterton wrote:


. . . and the lion lay down with the lamb. But remember that this text is too lightly interpreted. It is constantly assured . . . that when the lion lies down with the lamb the lion becomes lamblike. But that is brutal annexation and imperialism on the part of the lamb. That is simply the lamb absorbing the lion instead of the lion eating the lamb. The real problem is -- can the lion lie down with the lamb and still retain his royal ferocity?
(Gilbert K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy (New York: John Lane Co., 1909), p. 180-181.

7 comments:

mompriest said...

Can the lion be authentically who he is without giving into portions of that self? It would seem so.

Jennifer said...

I believe those who are fundamentally different can co-exist...

INTPanentheist said...

This is a different wording to a question that has been bothering me a great deal lately, although on a more personal and less overarching level. I wish I knew.

Anonymous said...

To deny one's true self is to lie to the world. The lion is what it does; It's form fitting it's function, which is in part to eat meat. Can the lion lie down with the lamb and still retain it's royal ferocity? That all depends on how much the lion's had to eat prior to laying down with the lamb and how fat and tasty the lamb is looking that particular evening.

viagra said...

Yea, but you mean that this can be a fatal problem because the book was wrong ?

xlpharmacy said...

Portly, fun loving, witty G.K. Chesterton decided to write this book as a companion volume to his book HERETICS. Since HERETICS had criticised contemporary philosophies, ORTHODOXY was written to present an alternative viewpoint, and is therefore both affirmative in tone and autobiographical in many places.

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